Wine Tasting For Beginners

Attending wine tasting events can be a great experience and a lot of fun, although a lot of people choose not to attend out of fear – or not knowing what to do or what to expect.

Even though there are no mysteries to wine tasting, there are some things that you should always remember

During a wine tasting event, women are always served before the men.

Some tastings will serve you bottled water between tastings, so you can clean your mouth out and be ready to taste the next wine that is served. When you take the wine, you should always handle the glass by the stem, to avoid heating it with your hands. There will also be crackers and other goodies on hand as well, to help you cleanse your mouth between wine tastings.

person holding clear wine glass

As you may already know, you can tell quite a bit about the wine by the color.

When you attend a wine tasting for the first time, youíll notice that the glasses are clear. This helps you to examine the wine better. There should also be white tablecloth on the table as well, to help you see the color the wine more clearly. You should never go by the name of the wine alone, as it can easily fool you.

You’ll also notice the more experienced wine tastes swirl their wine around in the glass before they taste it.

Although it may look weird, slightly swirling the wine actually helps to bring out the flavor. Most wines have been aging in bottles for long periods of time, sometimes even years. When the wine is swirled around in the glass, the swirling will release the flavors in the wine and bring them out when the wine is tasted.

At wine tastings, you’ll need to look at the wine, smell it, then after swirling it around in the glass – taste it.

Smells play an integral part of the process, as youíll get a lot more from the wine by smelling it first. Wine has quite an intriguing aroma, which helps to bring out the taste that wine is so well known for. Once you have smelled the wine, you should allow a few moments to take in the smell and think about the wine that you are smelling.

shallow focus photography of clear champagne glass

Last but not least, you’ll want to know how to properly taste the wine.

Your tongue has taste buds in the front and the back, which helps to detect flavors. Wine is full of flavors, and how you taste it will make the biggest impact. When you put the wine in your mouth, you should always swish it around in your mouth for a few seconds, and allow the flavors plenty of time to dance on your palate. Once your taste buds have started to discover the wine, you can think about what you are tasting. After swallowing the wine, the aftertaste that remains in your mouth should give you even more of an idea as to the type and flavor of the wine.

person holding glass bottle on round brown wooden table

Before you attend a wine tasting, you should always learn as much as you can about the many different flavors and varieties of wine.

This way, youíll have a better understanding of what you should look for in both taste and flavor. Even though you may be new to wine tasting, you should never pass up an opportunity to go. Youíll get a great experience in the world of wine tasting and get to experience wines that you may have never heard of before.

Wine Bottling

I would advise you only in this: make, say, a gallon or a half-gallon of a variety of wines and then decide which you prefer over a period of time.

The ideal utensils to use for winemaking and boiling ingredients & juices are those of good quality enamel.

Those sold under a brand name are most reliable. The utensils must not be chipped.

It is almost impossible to pour clear wine from one bottle to another without stirring up the lees. Because of this, it is a good plan, to siphon off the clear wine when rebottling it.

Using about a yard and a half of surgical rubber tubing or plastic tubing, siphoning is a very simple operation.

First, put the bottles or jars of wine on a table and the empty bottles on a stool or box on the floor. Next, put one end of the tubing in the first bottle of wine and suck the other end of the tube until the wine comes; pinch the tube at your lips and – holding on tight – put this end in the empty bottle and then let the wine flow. As the level of the wine falls, lower the tube into it, being careful not to let it touch the lees. When nearly all of the wine has been transferred, pinch the tube at the neck of both bottles, put one end into the next bottle and allow the wine to flow again.

In this way a constant flow is maintained and you have bottles of crystal-clear wine. The sediment from each bottle may be put together; this will clear in time to leave a little more wine.

Most of you will already have heard of one or other home-made wine and will have decided which to make. For those who have not yet decided, preference for a ‘port* or ‘whisky’ may be the deciding factor and this must rest with yourselves.

I would advise you only in this

make, say, a gallon or a half-gallon of a variety of wines, and then decide which you prefer over a period of time. I have whittled my own preference down to nine different wines which I brew regularly according to the season, leaving the dried fruit for the time when fresh fruit is not available and when roots – potatoes, etc. – are too fresh for wine-making purposes.

NOTE:

Different recipes will call for slightly different approaches, but it must be remembered that whatever else has to be done, the brew must be kept in a warm place throughout the fermentation period, and that the process after fourteen days* fermentation in the tub is the same with all recipes.

Now select your recipe and go ahead with your wine-making, bearing in mind all that I have warned you about.